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Rikitza
Riki (Richard)
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Incredible India - museum in Jaipur
Incredible India - museum in Jaipur
from the Wikipedia:
The 
Albert Hall Museum is a museum in Jaipur in RajasthanIndia. It is the oldest museum of the state and functions as the State museum of Rajasthan
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Incredible India - landing in Mumbai
The India Getaway and the Taj Mahal Prince Hotel are welcoming us on arriving with the boat to Mumbai.
two impressive and monumental structures realized in the xx-th century 
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Incredible India - reading the holy book
Incredible India - reading the holy book of the Sikhs - the Guru Granth Sahib by a sikh priest within the precincts of the Golden Temple  in Amritsar

(Gurū Gra°th Sāhib Jī), Punjabi pronunciation: [ɡʊɾu ɡɾəntʰ sɑhɪb]/ˈɡʊər ɡrɑːnθ səˈhɪb/) is the central religious scripture of Sikhism, regarded by Sikhs as the final, sovereign and eternal living Guru following the lineage of the ten human Gurus of the religion.[1] The Adi Granth, the first rendition, was compiled by the fifth Sikh GuruGuru Arjan (1563–1606). Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru, did not add any of his own hymns; however, he added all 115 hymns of Guru Tegh Bahadur, the ninth Sikh Guru, to the Adi Granth and affirmed the text as his successor.[2] This second rendition became known as Guru Granth Sahib.[3] After Guru Gobind Singh died, Baba Deep Singh and Bhai Mani Singh prepared many copies of the work for distribution.[4]

The text consists of 1430 Angs (pages) and 6,000 śabads (line compositions),[5][6] which are poetically rendered and set to a rhythmic ancient north Indian classical form of music.[7] The bulk of the scripture is classified into thirty-one rāgas, with each Granth rāga subdivided according to length and author. The hymns in the scripture are arranged primarily by the rāgas in which they are read.[5] The Guru Granth Sahib is written in the Gurmukhī script, in various dialects, including Lahnda (Western Punjabi), Braj BhashaKhariboliSanskritSindhi, and Persian – often coalesced under the generic title of Sant Bhasha.[8]

Guru Granth Sahib is predominantly composed by six Sikh Gurus: Guru Nanak, Guru Angad, Guru Amar Das, Guru Ram Das, Guru Arjan, and Guru Teg Bahadur. It also contains the traditions and teachings of fourteen Hindu Bhakti movement sants (saints), such as RamanandaKabir and Namd ev among others, and one Muslim Sufi saint: Sheikh Farid.[9][10]

The vision in the Guru Granth Sahib, states Torkel Brekke, is a society based on divine justice without oppression of any kind.[11][12] While the Granth acknowledges and respects the scriptures of Hinduism and Islam, it does not imply a syncretic bridge between Hinduism and Islam.[13] It is installed in a Sikh gurdwara (temple); many Sikhs bow or prostrate before it on entering the temple.[14] The Granth is revered as eternal gurbānī and the spiritual authority in Sikhism

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Incredible India - baby Taj in Agra

Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah   

Mausoleum of Itmad-ud-Daulah's tomb (front view)

Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah (Urduاعتماد الدولہ کا مقبرہ‎, I'timād-ud-Daulah kā Maqbara) is a Mughal mausoleum in the city of Agra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. Often described as a "jewel box", sometimes called the "Baby Tāj", the tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is often regarded as a draft of the Tāj Mahal.

Along with the main building, the structure consists of numerous outbuildings and gardens. The tomb, built between 1622 and 1628 represents a transition between the first phase of monumental Mughal architecture – primarily built from red sandstone with marble decorations, as in Humayun's Tomb in Delhi and Akbar's tomb in Sikandra – to its second phase, based on white marble and pietra dura inlay, most elegantly realized in the Tāj Mahal.

The mausoleum was commissioned by Nūr Jahān, the wife of Jahangir, for her father Mirzā Ghiyās Beg, originally a Persian Amir in exile,[1] who had been given the title of I'timād-ud-Daulah (pillar of the state). Mirzā Ghiyās Beg was also the grandfather of Mumtāz Mahāl (originally named Arjūmand Bāno, daughter of Asaf Khān), the wife of the emperor Shāh Jahān, responsible for the construction of the Tāj Mahal. Nur Jehan was also responsible for the construction of the Tomb of Jehangir at Lahore.

Tomb[edit]  

Cenotaphs at the Tomb of Itmad-ud-Daulah

Located on the right bank of the Yamuna River, the mausoleum is set in a large cruciform garden criss-crossed by water courses and walkways. The mausoleum itself covers about twenty-three meters square, and is built on a base about fifty meters square and about one meter high. On each corner are hexagonal towers, about thirteen meters tall.

The walls are made up from white marble from Rajasthan encrusted with semi-precious stone decorations – cornelianjasperlapis lazulionyx, and topaz formed into images of cypress trees and wine bottles, or more elaborate decorations like cut fruit or vases containing bouquets. Light penetrates to the interior through delicate jālī screens of intricately carved white marble. The interior decoration is considered by many to have inspired that of the Taj Mahal, which was built by her stepson, Mughal emperor Shah Jahan.

Many of Nūr Jahān's relatives are interred in the mausoleum. The only asymmetrical element of the entire complex is that the cenotaphs of her father and mother have been set side-by-side, a formation replicated in the Tāj Mahal.

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Incredible India - colums and pensive mood
Incredible India -  colums and pensive mood
captured at the Amber Fort in Jaipur - Rajasthan
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Incredible India - staircase to Khajuraho temple
Incredible India - staircase to Khajuraho temple

The temples at Khajuraho were built during the Chandella dynasty, which reached its apogee between 950 and 1050. Only about 20 temples remain; they fall into three distinct groups and belong to two different religions – Hinduism and Jainism. They strike a perfect balance between architecture and sculpture. The Temple of Kandariya is decorated with a profusion of sculptures that are among the greatest masterpieces of Indian art.

The erotic and other carvings that swathe Khajuraho’s three groups of World Heritage–listed temples are among the finest temple art in the world. The Western Group of temples, in particular, contains some stunning sculptures.

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Incredible India - mustard fields for ever
Incredible India - mustard fields for ever
image taken near Agra
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Incredible India - on the bridge in Mumbai
Incredible India - on the bridge in Mumbai

from the wikipedia:
The Bandra–Worli Sea Link, officially called Rajiv Gandhi Sea Link, is a cable-stayed bridge with pre-stressed concrete-steel viaducts on either side that links Bandra in the Western Suburbs of Mumbai with Worli in South Mumbai.[1] The bridge is a part of the proposed Western Freeway that will link the Western Suburbs to Nariman Point in Mumbai's main business district.
Bandra Worli Sealink During Early Monsoon
The ₹16 billion (US$240 million) bridge was commissioned by the Maharashtra State Road Development Corporation (MSRDC), and built by the Hindustan Construction Company. The first four of the eight lanes of the bridge were opened to the public on 30 June 2009. All eight lanes were opened on 24 March 2010.
The sea-link reduces travel time between Bandra and Worli during peak hours from 60–90 minutes to 20–30 minutes.
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Incredible India - India future
Incredible India - India future
this very sweet little girl met in the langar at Amritsar is the guarantee for the bright future I forecast this marvelous country and people that is INDIA
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climbing the Himalaya
climbing the Himalaya
upon returning from our trip to the Incredible India, the only reference to the Himalaya, I could find in my pics was this snapshot taken several months earlier in Paris ... 
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Incredible India - on a street at mid-day
Incredible India - on a street at mid-day
image taken in Jaipur the capital of Rajasthan
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Incredible India - the girl with the baloons
Incredible India - the girl with the baloons
on the streets of New Delhi loitering between cars ...
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Comments


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:icongmatty:
Gmatty Featured By Owner 3 hours ago
Thank you Riki! :) (Smile) 
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:iconrikitza:
Rikitza Featured By Owner 1 hour ago   Photographer
deserved
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:iconsurrealistic-gloom:
surrealistic-gloom Featured By Owner 6 hours ago
Thank you so much for the favourite, Riki!  :heart:
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:iconrikitza:
Rikitza Featured By Owner 4 hours ago   Photographer
:heart:
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:iconsadova302b50:
Sadova302b50 Featured By Owner 14 hours ago
Thank you very much for the favs! :-)
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